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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Debates Are History, Now What?

A day after the third and final presidential debate, Republican Mitt Romney campaigns in West Palm Beach, Fla. and Pres. Barack Obama campaigns in Delray Beach, Fla. (AP)

President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney are on an all-out sprint to election day. The president started an eight-state, three-day swing Tuesday morning in Delray, Florida. He’ll even spend one night on Air Force One.

Gov. Romney will be in Nevada later today and by week’s end both candidates will have visited Florida, Colorado, Nevada, Virginia, Iowa and all-important Ohio.

Obama officials told Politico that they will focus on the Midwest in Iowa, Wisconsin and Ohio. They will also spend more time in Nevada.

The Romney campaign is sounding very confident and has said Romney will get 305 electoral votes – many more than the 270 needed to win. They will focus on Ohio, Colorado, Iowa and New Hampshire.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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