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Friday, September 28, 2012

The British Punk Band ‘The Vaccines’ Hits Number One

(The Vaccines)

If you’re a British punk pop band whose debut album reached number four on the charts last year and you’re heralded as the return of the great guitar bands, what do you do for an encore?

How about make sure your follow up album hits number one. That’s what the Vaccines did with their second album, “The Vaccines Come of Age.”

The Vaccines are four 20-somethings out of West London, Justin Young on guitars and vocals, Arni Arnason on bass, Freddie Cowan on guitar and Pete Robertson on drums.

Rolling Stone magazine described them as “a band to watch” after their first album “What Do You Expect From The Vaccines” came out with catchy anthems like “Wreckin’ Ball.”

The Vaccines’s new album hit the number-one spot on the British charts this month. It will be released here in the U.S. on Tuesday.

Guests:

  • Justin Young, frontman for the Vaccines
  • Arni Arnason, bass player for the Vaccines

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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