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Thursday, September 13, 2012

Angry Protests Continue Across Arab World

Yemeni protestors break windows of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam’s Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday. (AP)

Demonstrators shouted “death to America” outside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, the capital of Yemen Thursday.

It’s the latest in the series of protests that started outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo and resulted in the killing of the U.S. ambassador to Libya on Tuesday.

The BBC’s Jon Leyne told Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer that tensions in Cairo were still high and rising.

“It’s a situation that seems to be escalating by the hour, by the minute,” he said. “There are running battles between the police and protestors” just outside the U.S. Embasssy.

The protests were sparked when an excerpt of a movie that mocked the prophet Muhammad surfaced on You Tube.

Guest:

  • Jon Leyne, BBC reporter in Cairo

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