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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Beyond The iPhone: From ‘Roundphone’ To Screenless Smartphone

Will a “Roundphone” be the smartphone of the future?

Apple’s big announcement in San Francisco Wednesday got us thinking: What will the smart phone of the future look like?

Just as the iPhone revolutionized how cell phones look and how we use them, new technology could one day transform smart phones into something completely different.

The global marketing company eYeka launched a contest, asking its crowdsourcing community to come up with the smartphone of the future.

Some of the entries included a phone made of flexible material that could be folded up to the size of a credit card and expanded to the size of a tablet computer. Future cell phones could also be transparent, or the size of a large button that projects holograms.

While some of these phones are still just on the drawing board, much of the technology already exists to bring these futuristic cell phones to the marketplace.

Guest:

  • Joel Cere, of the website eYeka

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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