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Friday, September 7, 2012

How One Player Can Influence A Grand Slam — By Not Showing Up

It’s semifinal time at the US Open, the annual stateside Grand Slam venue for professional tennis at Flushing Meadows in Queens, New York. The women play today, the men on Saturday.

So far, we’ve seen American Andy Roddick play his last pro match after announcing his retirement, and the exit of number one seed Roger Federer at the hands of sixth-seeded Tomas Berdych from the Czech Republic.

And Wall Street Journal reporter Tom Perrotta says that the men’s side has been influenced by the lack of Rafael Nadal, who did not enter the tournament because of an injury.

“Nadal has really left a mark on this tournament without being here. And not being here for the final weekend… leaves an opening for everyone,” Perrotta told Here & Now‘s Sacha Pfeiffer.

Meanwhile, Serena Williams is steam rolling along the women’s bracket and looks poised to capture another Grand Slam title.

Guest:

  • Tom Perrotta, reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

July 22 2 Comments

Remains Of Clovis Boy Reburied In Montana

DNA from the boy buried 12,600 years ago shows his people were ancestors of many of today's native peoples.

July 22 Comment

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Retired pilot John Ransom discusses how to factor in war zones, and how the decision is made to close an airspace.

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Boxing Attracts More Than Would-Be Fighters

At the Ring Boxing Club, boxers range in age, are both men and women, and include an award-winning author.

July 21 Comment

Why Hot Cars Are So Deadly

An average of 38 kids die in a hot car every year in the U.S. We look at the science of why cars get so hot so fast, and why children are more vulnerable.