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Friday, August 31, 2012

Literature, Music And Barbecue: Getting To Know N.C.

Patrons leave Wilber's Barbecue in Goldsboro, N.C. in 2008. Wilber's uses vinegar-based BBQ sauce for an eastern North Carolina  flavor. (AP/Jim R.Bounds)

Patrons leave Wilber’s Barbecue in Goldsboro, N.C. in 2008. Wilber’s uses vinegar-based BBQ sauce for an eastern North Carolina flavor. (AP/Jim R.Bounds)

Ron Rash has written several books set in North Carolina and his roots are deep there: his family has lived in the state since the late 1700′s. He tells us that it’s not one state, but several, there are geographical, cultural and political differences across the state.

Ron tells Here and Now’s Sacha Pfeifer that that North Carolinians take three things very seriously “literature, music, and barbecue, that’s the sacred triangle there.”

“I was actually telling somebody, I felt safe talking about politics and art, but talking about barbecue is scary,” says Rash.

Guest:


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  • ronlee

    Why do pigs on so many bbq joint signs seem to have big smiles? 
    I stopped eating meat ~3 years ago (and don’t miss it).
    Now I use my bbq for veggie burgers and Quorn chickn patties (and occasionally fish, but we’re eating less fish these days as well). 
    Personally, I wish people ate far less meat – or we learned how to let these animals live a free range, long life before ending their lives.

  • Rievler

    Greatly enjoyed Rash’s commentary until he incorrectly identified the “proper” pronunciation of Appalachia.  Short a, not long a. Only New Englanders and possibly geologists use the effete long a pronunciation. We who live here in the cultural hillbilly hearth say it Appal-latch-uh, not Appal-lay-shia

  • Ronrash

    To all Ap pa latch ans and others. I was so nervous doing my interview that I said the opposite of what I meant as far as the pronunciation. Ap pa LAY chin is often used  by folks outside western North Carolina, but Ap pa LATCH in is used by natives. Ron Rash

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