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Thursday, June 21, 2012

‘Fast And Furious’ Sparks Conspiracy Theories About Second Amendment

Members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee including Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., left, confers with Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., center, the ranking member, and Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., right, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday. (AP)

A House committee Wednesday voted to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt for withholding documents related to the Justice Department investigation into the “Fast and Furious” gun-tracking operation. Some lawmakers on the right are saying that the operation was an attempt to curtail gun rights in the United States.

Republican Darrell Issa, head of the panel that cited Holder for contempt, told Fox News recently that the Obama Administration used the operation to limit second amendment rights.

Guest:

  • Josh Gerstein, White House reporter, Politico

Other stories from Thursday's show
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