90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Monday, June 4, 2012

Get Your Telescopes Ready For ‘Transit of Venus’

(AP)

It’s now or never for astronomers of all stripes to watch the planet Venus crawl for about six hours across the face of the sun. That’s something that won’t happen again for another 105 years.

It’s called a “Transit of Venus” and it occurs Tuesday in the western hemisphere and Wednesday in the eastern hemisphere, which is where Sky and Telescope magazine’s Kelly Beatty is waiting for the transit. He’ll watch on Point Venus on the island of Tahiti, one of the best seats on Earth to see this rare celestial event.

In North America, you can watch a partial Venus Transit starting at about 6:00 pm Eastern time and lasting until sunset Tuesday.

But as Sky & Telescope notes, if you’re planning on viewing the transit, make sure to protect your eyes:

You’ll need to take careful precautions when attempting to view the transit. There are several good ways to do this safely. You can view through special “eclipse shades” (not regular sunglasses) or a dark rectangular arc-welder’s glass (#13 or #14). Or, you can set up your telescope or even tripod-mounted binoculars to project the Sun’s image onto a white card or other flat surface. Solar filters are also made to fit over the front of your telescope. Check out these safe-viewing options recommended by the editors of Sky & Telescope.

Guest:

  • Kelly Beatty, Sky & Telescope Magazine

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Crawfield

    Great story, with great historical insights.  Another error, though.  Any date that begins with “18..”, is the 19th century, not the 18th.

  • Rbot2010

    I’m horrified by the picture that was used for this article. It’s careless for anyone to be viewing the sun directly with a telescope. I sincerely hope that readers take note of the safety precautions that Sky and Telescope has outlined. Enjoy the transit but please do take care of your eyes.

    • Lishore

       this telescope has a solar filter on it. makes viewing the sun 100% safe. We used telescopes with solar filters at point venus in tahiti to observe the transit

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

July 24 6 Comments

Veterans Say Suicide Is Their Top Concern

That's according to a survey released today by the group Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA).

July 24 5 Comments

Modern-Day Amelia Earhart Circumnavigates The Globe

The famous pilot's namesake has became the youngest woman to fly a single-engine aircraft around the world.

July 23 Comment

DJ Sessions: Latin Alternative From Los Angeles To Venezuela

KCRW's Raul Campos introduces us to some groups he came across while hosting the 15th annual Latin Alternative Music Conference.

July 23 6 Comments

ISIS Forces Christians To Flee Iraq City Of Mosul

The militant group's threat -- convert, leave or die -- has forced most Christians in Mosul to leave.