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Thursday, January 12, 2012

Detroit’s Engines Hum As Car Sales Rise

The Chrysler 700c concept is shown at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. (AP)

Last month Chrysler posted a 37 percent increase in sales of cars and light trucks, Ford saw a 10 percent gain and General Motors reported a 4.6 percent rise. All told for the full year, Chrysler’s sales went up 26 percent, Ford’s 11 percent and GM’s 13 percent.

But was it just because Japanese car makers have struggled to get back to full production after last year’s earthquake and flooding in Thailand? Both Toyota and Honda had one of their worst years in decades, they saw sales drop last year. And at this week’s North American International Auto Show in Detroit, American car makers are unveiling cars of the future that they hope will keep customers buying American.

Guest:

  • Paul Eisenstein, publisher of TheDetroitBureau.com, says “the big question is, is this a fluke, can Detroit keep it going?”

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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