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Thursday, October 13, 2011

Occupy Wall Street And The History Of Leaderless Movements

Occupy Wall Street protesters march around One Chase Manhattan Plaza on Wednesday. (AP)

Occupy Wall Street protesters march around One Chase Manhattan Plaza on Wednesday. (AP)

What started as a New York-based cry for economic justice has spread to 60 cities around the country, and is popping up around the world.

And yet, as critics point out, it’s not easy to pin-point what those participating in Occupy Wall Street and its sister protests are asking for.

Fordham University sociology professor and activist Heather Gautney says Occupy Wall Street is one of many leaderless movements in history. She explains how it works: they’re based on general assemblies and spokescouncils, and even though meetings take forever, there’s an integrity to it.

Guest:

  • Heather Gautney, Fordham University sociology professor

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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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