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Tuesday, October 11, 2011

NBA Season In Jeopardy

President of the Players Union Derek Fisher, center, talks with reporters after leaving stalled NBA labor talk meeting yesterday. (AP)

President of the Players Union Derek Fisher talks with reporters after leaving stalled NBA labor talk meeting yesterday. (AP)

Sports fans hoping for a quick transition to basketball after baseball’s World Series wraps up this month are out of luck. Last night, commissioner David Stern made good on his promise and canceled the first two weeks of the 2011-2012 National Basketball Association season – that’s 100 games – after owners and players failed to reach a new contract.

Stern said, “We just have a gulf that separates us,” adding that the sides are very far apart on virtually all issues. The cancellations mark the NBA’s first work stoppage since the 1998-99 season was reduced to 50 games.

Guest:

  • Gabriel Feldman, director of the Tulane University Sports Law Program

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Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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