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Tuesday, July 12, 2011

NY Pet Stores Ban ‘Drunk Puppy Buying’

Greenwich Village, New York is a frequent stop for happy hour, and that’s led to a problem for some pet stores there.

Tipsy shoppers, on the way home from the bars, become smitten with puppies, and make drunken, impulse puppy purchases.

But the next day, they would often come back to the store, tail between their legs, and return the pups. It’s even led to some dangerous situations, where one puppy was returned in extremely bad health.

Two West Village pet stores, Le Petit Puppy and CitiPups, have decided to ban “drunk puppy buying.” In fact, the stores don’t even allow customers to handle the puppies if they’ve been drinking.

Store employees say the best course of action: tell the customers to come back the next day, by the time alcohol-induced puppy love has had time to fade.

Guest

  • Dana Deraugh, manager of Le Petit Puppy

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