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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Where Do Exiled Dictators Go?

Former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo, center, and his wife Simone, are seen in the custody of republican forces loyal to election winner Alassane Ouattara at the Golf Hotel in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Monday, April 11, 2011. (AP)

Former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo, center, and his wife Simone, are seen in the custody of republican forces loyal to election winner Alassane Ouattara at the Golf Hotel in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Monday, April 11, 2011. (AP)

It used to be that exiled leaders had the option to spend their forced retirement in sunny, exotic places, spending the money they brought with them. But with an increase in prosecutions through the International Criminal Court, ousted leaders have fewer options these days.

International lawyer Scott Horton says leaders who may be looking for a way out, such as former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, deposed Ivory Coast leader Laurent Gbagbo and Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi may find themselves running from the law rather than to a cushy retirement spot.


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