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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Anti-nuclear Activist In Japan Wonders:’Could We Have Done More’

A woman holds a sign against nuclear power during anti-war and anti-nuclear march in Tokyo. (AP)

A woman holds a sign against nuclear power during anti-war and anti-nuclear march in Tokyo that have taken place since the earthquake. (AP)

Japanese broadcaster NHK is reporting that Japan’s Prime Minister Naoto Kan has hinted he will review the country’s nuclear energy policy and possibly scrap plans to build at least 14 new nuclear power plants over the next 20 years.

Anti-nuclear activists in Japan are cheering the news. Philip White, the international liaison officer for the Citizens’ Nuclear Information Center tells us that most of those power plants were probably never going to be built anyway, and he describes how some in the protest movement are blaming themselves for not being able to prevent the disaster at Fukushima.


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