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Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Debate Rages Over US Role In Libya

Libyan rebels stop on the road as mortars from Moammar Gadhafi's forces are fired on them on the outskirts of the city of Ajdabiya, south of Benghazi, eastern Libya Tuesday. (AP)

Libyan rebels stop on the road as mortars from Moammar Gadhafi's forces are fired on them on the outskirts of the city of Ajdabiya, south of Benghazi, eastern Libya Tuesday. (AP)

President Obama insists the military operation in Libya serves U.S. interests, but military analyst Andrew Bacevich is skeptical of that claim. Bacevich says the mission in Libya will eventually expand to regime change regardless of intentions. And he wonders if this means we’ll go into Yemen, Syria or Bahrain next.

We speak with Bacevich, who is professor of history and international relations at Boston University. His most recent book is “Washington Rules: America’s Path To Permanent War.”


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  • Guest

    I enjoyed this segment and think Bacevich makes very good points.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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