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Monday, March 14, 2011

Japanese Scramble To Stop Possible Meltdown At Nuclear Power Plants

Fire department officials wait for arriving residents evacuated from areas surrounding the Fukushima nuclear facilities Sunday, in Koriyama city, Japan. (AP)

Fire department officials wait for arriving residents evacuated from areas surrounding the Fukushima nuclear facilities Sunday, in Koriyama city, Japan. (AP)

Japan is bracing for a third possible explosion at its troubled  Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Two hydrogen explosions have already rocked the plant, injuring several workers. Water levels dropped severely at another reactor, completely exposing the fuel rods and raising the threat of a meltdown, which happens when the fuel pellets get so hot, they burn through the containment structures.

We speak with Paddy Regan, a nuclear physicist at the University of Surrey in the U.K.


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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

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