Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
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Thursday, February 3, 2011

Scientists Blame Dramatic Weather On Weakening ‘Arctic Fence’

Hundreds of cars are seen stranded on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. (AP)

Hundreds of cars are seen stranded on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. (AP)

Many parts of Europe and the U.S. have seen unusual snowstorms and frigid temperatures for two years in a row. But places like northern Canada and Greenland have seen temperatures that in some months are running 15 to 20 degrees above average.

The reason, some researchers say, is a weakening “vortex,” a kind of atmospheric fence, that normally keeps cold air up north and warmer air south. We speak with Justin Gillis, who covers climate issues for the New York Times, about why the weather world seems to have flipped upside down.

Other stories from Thursday's show
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Experts share a range of perspectives on how to combat the Islamic State militant group, and the role the U.S. should play.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

November 24 7 Comments

Ferguson: One Year Later

City council member Wesley Bell looks back on the past year since protests and violence swept the Missouri city.

November 24 3 Comments

Sam Sifton’s Tips For A Happy, Delicious Thanksgiving For All

The New York Times' food editor talks about his favorite dishes and how to accommodate everyone without going crazy.

November 23 3 Comments

James Taylor Is ‘Gobsmacked’ By Medal Of Freedom Honor

The five-time Grammy winner looks back on his career, ahead of receiving the country's highest civilian honor.

November 23 26 Comments

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966.