90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
Mathworks - Accelerating the pace of engineering and science
Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Thursday, January 6, 2011

Lawmakers Read Constitution As President Shuffles Staff

New House Minority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) takes part in reading the U.S. Constitution on the House floor. (screen capture: C-span.org)

And on the second day of Republican rule, the House reads the Constitution. The GOP made strict adherence to the 4,543-word document a key tenet of their effort to reduce the size and scope of the federal government, and volunteers are giving voice to the seven articles and 27 amendments.

Also today, the House will take up its first spending cut measure, a proposed five percent trim in the budgets of leadership, rank-and-file members and committee offices. Republicans have estimated that this will save $35 million over the next nine months. Meanwhile, President Obama begins to remake his staff to prepare for the next two years of governing with Republicans in charge of the House. Jay Newton-Small of Time Magazine joins us with the latest.


Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.
  • Ted Paxton

    They also voted to not disclose their personal healthcare provider. So, they can be against the new healthcare reform, while also taking advantage of it. Genius!

  • http://understandit.ml1.net/ Alex J

    Ah, taxpayer money at work. I’m thinking this crop of showmen might be no better than the last. If this is supposed to have some benefit to kids and their interest in the constitution, what happened to the role of the schools in that regard?

  • iolo

    at just under 5000 words, the entire constitution has about 10 words for each rep. to mumble through and try to make sense of – good luck with that -
    next, will some of them be sitting there like those TV preachers? – going over each word and telling us what they think god, and the writers of this constitution, really mean – all the while, by the way, some of these folks couldn’t pass an English 100 class at a middling public college
    At least real parrots have beautiful feathers and can be affectionate – these clowns are just leaving bird droppings behind!

  • One Private-sector Frog

    Jay Newton-Small said “Republicans haven’t come up with a constitutional justification for repealing” the health care bill. Huh?! There is PLENTY of Constitutional justification for Congress repealing THEIR OWN BILLS!

  • http://tanishamills.co.cc/ Tanisha Mills

    at just under 5000 words, the entire constitution has about 10 words for each rep. to mumble through and try to make sense of – good luck with that – next, will some of them be sitting there like those TV preachers? – going over each word and telling us what they think god, and the writers of this constitution, really mean – all the while, by the way, some of these folks couldn’t pass an English 100 class at a middling public college At least real parrots have beautiful feathers and can be affectionate – these clowns are just leaving bird droppings behind!

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

April 23 3 Comments

Kenyan Author’s Missing Chapter: Being Openly Gay

Acclaimed memoirist Binyavanga Wainaina talks about his writing, Africa today and his new life as an openly gay man.

April 23 Comment

Sherpas Walk Out From Everest Base Camp

On Mount Everest today, dozens of Sherpas packed up their gear and left base camp, after a lack of response to their demands.

April 22 Comment

What Do We Have To Teach Plato?

Philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein discusses her new book "Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away."

April 22 21 Comments

Children’s Literature: Apartheid Or Just A General Lack of Color?

African-American children's book authors Walter Dean Myers and his son Christopher Myers weigh in.