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Monday July 19, 2010

Government Agrees To Keep Cap Shut Despite Leakage

There are concerns today that a substance seeping from the seabed may be a sign of further damage to the BP oil well.  However, the federal government is allowing the valves on the well’s new cap to remain shut for another 24 hours. The extension was granted in return for BP’s promise to look out for new leaks in the surrounding seabed. We speak with Henry Fountain of the New York Times.

Hardwick, Vermont Writes Blueprint For Local Food Movement

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wbur/sets/72157624535367910/

The town of Hardwick, Vermont, population 3,200, has become a mecca for foodies, from celebrity chef Emeril Legasse to writers for the New York Times food section. And while that has brought some good jobs to the area, most residents can’t afford the local food. We speak with Vermont farmer and freelance journalist Ben Hewitt, who has documented the Hardwick story in his new book, “The Town Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality In Local Food.”

Saving Sea Turtles From The Gulf Oil

The first group of hatchlings from endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle eggs brought from beaches along the Gulf Coast being released into the Atlantic Ocean off NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. (AP Photo/NASA)

On beaches along the Gulf of Mexico, biologists and volunteers are  picking up fragile sea turtle eggs to protect them from oil that’s inundating the shores and ocean.  The eggs are driven across Florida in FedEx trucks to a climate-controlled warehouse at the Kennedy Space Center, where the eggs hatch.  The new hatchlings are then safely returned to the ocean. We speak with Dr. Robbin Trindell, sea turtle expert with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

From 1965 Quota Ban To Arizona’s New Law: How State Power Intersects With Immigration Policy

Arizona’s controversial new immigration law goes into affect at the end of the month.   The state will require police to verify the immigration status of a suspect they encounter while carrying out routine police work. The law’s detractors say it promotes racial profiling and oversteps the state’s power. Have race and the limits of state power always played a part in immigration policy? We take a look back to 1965, when an historic law abolishing strict immigration quotas changed the fact of modern America. Our guest is Gabriel “Jack” Chin, professor at University of Arizona’s Rogers College of Law.

Singer’s Search For Birth Mother Inspires New Album

Mary Gauthier (Flickr/Atomic Pope)

After visiting the New Orleans orphanage where she spent the first year of her life, singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier was inspired to begin a search for her birth mother. The result is a new album about the experience. We speak with Gauthier about her latest release, “The Foundling.”

Music From The Show

  • Phish, “My Friend, My Friend”
  • The Slip, “Tinderbox”
  • Emmitt/Nershi Band, “Flight of the Durban”
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Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

February 26 34 Comments

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

In most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you from getting fired over a political bumper sticker.

February 26 2 Comments

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Thanks to cheaper technology, community organizers and computer hackers are bypassing the big cell companies.

February 25 Comment

DJ Sessions: New Music From Nashville

For this week's DJ Session, Marcia Campbell shares songs from Teea Goans, Reba McEntire, Chris Stapleton and Earls of Leicester.

February 25 105 Comments

Feminist Gamer Withdraws From PAX East, Citing Safety Concerns

Video game developer Brianna Wu discusses the threats against her and her role as a feminist leader amid the Gamergate controversy.