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Monday November 23, 2009

Mammogram Controversy

We’re learning more today about how controversial new guidelines on mammograms came about. The group that issued the recommendations last week, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, studied the benefits and risks of mammograms, as well as how often women should have them, incorporating new understanding of how cancers grow. The group’s recommendations that annual mammograms aren’t effective for women in their 40’s surprised at least one researcher. We speak with Gina Kolata, science reporter for the New York Times.

Regulating Wall Street

Major bills to regulate the finance industry are inching forward in Congress. So what’s being proposed? We’ll speak with Michael Greenberger, professor of law at the University of Maryland. Greenberger argues for more oversight over financial instruments like derivatives.

Khmer Rouge

The trial of the former Khmer Rouge prison chief, Kaing Guek Eav, better known as Comrade Duch, is entering its final stages. Duch is accused of running a prison where thousands of people were tortured and murdered in the late 1970s. As many as two million people are believed to have died under the Khmer Rouge, the Maoist regime that controlled Cambodia from 1975 to 1979. But that history hasn’t been a part of the school curriculum for Cambodia students. That’s changing now thanks to a new textbook. The BBC’s Guy De Launey has the story.

Containers to Clinics

The examining room at the C2C Clinic at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. (Jill Ryan)

The examining room at the C2C Clinic at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. (Jill Ryan)

A recent report from the WHO found that in 2007, 9 million children died before their fifth birthday in the world’s poorest countries, and many of those deaths — usually from TB or diarrhea — were preventable. Elizabeth Sheehan is trying to prevent some of those deaths by turning used shipping containers into health clinics in developing countries. She says “shipping Containers litter the world. They’re often used once and they sit there.” Her group is called Containers to Clinics.

The Mormon as Vampire

“The Twilight Saga: New Moon” grossed $140 million in theaters this past weekend. The film, based on the second of the series of wildly popular books by Mormon author Stephanie Meyer, features a vampire as a romantic hero. But as Brigham Young University film curator James D’Arc tells us, at the beginning of the last century, vampire imagery was used to demonize those of the Mormon faith. With Jim, we look at the Bram Stoker novel “Dracula” and its impact on the 1911 anti-Mormon book “The Love Story of a Mormon” and film “Trapped by the Mormons.”

Music from the show

  • Dave Douglas, “A Single Sky”
  • MMW, “Bloody Oil”
  • The New Deal, “Then and Now”
  • Alexandre Desplat, “New Moon” performed by the London Symphony Orchestra
Spotlight

Here & Now resident chef and cookbook author Kathy Gunst shares her list of the best cookbooks of the year.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

December 18 Comment

College Counselor: ‘A Deferral Is Not A Denial’

Lisa Micele shares tips for applying to college — especially for students who have been deferred under early decision.

December 18 17 Comments

America’s Political Dynasties

Americans under 38 have only experienced one presidential election that did not involve a Bush or a Clinton.

December 17 2 Comments

Atticus Lish’s ‘Preparation For The Next Life’

The author's debut novel centers on an unlikely romance between an Iraq veteran and a Uyghur from China.

December 17 3 Comments

Diagnosing Ear Infections With Your Smartphone

The CellScope Oto is a clip-on gadget that turns a smartphone into an otoscope — the tool doctors use to check out a patient's eardrum.