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Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
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Tuesday December 9, 2008

Auto Industry Bailout–More Than Detroit Bargained For?

Congress is throwing the auto industry a lifeline with a lot of strings attached.

India and Pakistan

Should India confront Pakistan over the Mumbai attacks?

Governor Blagojevich’s Arrest

Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich was arrested this morning on a range of corruption charges.

A Red Kettle For Modern Times

The Salvation Army In El Paso County, Colorado is trying something new this year to attract donors. .

An Inauguration Gift From Earl Stafford

One businessman from Virginia recently paid one million dollars for a package at the Marriott in D.C….so he can bring wounded soldiers, poor and homeless people, and others as his guests to Obama’s inauguration.

Young at Heart

At age 73, Ken Mink is certainly the oldest player on the basketball team at Roane State Community College in Harriman, Tennessee.

Spotlight

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson are hitting the road to cover the elections. Our Tumblr brings you behind the scenes.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

February 4 5 Comments

Susan Tedeschi And Derek Trucks Talk Music And Marriage

The duo talks about their new album, "Let Me Get By," and about making music together as Tedeschi Trucks Band.

February 4 Comment

Do Babies Understand FaceTime And Skype?

It's reassuring for parents and grandparents far away from their little loved ones, but what do babies get out of it?

February 3 16 Comments

Telling The Story Of ‘The Invisibles’: White House Slaves

Of the first 18 presidents of the United States, 12 were slave owners, even though some spoke out against slavery.

February 3 112 Comments

Why Bernie Sanders Resonates With Young People

At the Iowa Democratic caucuses, he won 84 percent of voters aged 17 to 29, compared to Clinton's 14 percent.