PLEDGE NOW
Here and Now with Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
Public radio's live
midday news program
With sponsorship from
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Accelerating the pace
of engineering and science
Monday December 8, 2008

Matching Homeless People with “People-less” Homes

In Miami, a housing activist is taking action of his own- he’s finding abandoned, foreclosed homes and helping homeless families move in.

Factory Occupation

250 laid-off factory workers in Chicago occupy the Republic Doors and Windows factory, where some had worked for more than three decades.

Middle East

Don’t even try to broker a big peace deal between Israelis and the Palestinians… that’s the advice to Barack Obama from Aaron David Miller, who in his diplomatic career has worked with six U.S. Secretaries of State.

Letters

We air comments from listeners to some of our recent coverage.

The Taste of Conquest

Did you know that trade in spices such as pepper, nutmeg and cloves helped Lisbon, Venice and Amsterdam become major world powers in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

Spotlight

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson are hitting the road to cover the elections. Our Tumblr brings you behind the scenes.

Robin and Jeremy

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson host Here & Now, a live two-hour production of NPR and WBUR Boston.

February 4 5 Comments

Susan Tedeschi And Derek Trucks Talk Music And Marriage

The duo talks about their new album, "Let Me Get By," and about making music together as Tedeschi Trucks Band.

February 4 Comment

Do Babies Understand FaceTime And Skype?

It's reassuring for parents and grandparents far away from their little loved ones, but what do babies get out of it?

February 3 16 Comments

Telling The Story Of ‘The Invisibles’: White House Slaves

Of the first 18 presidents of the United States, 12 were slave owners, even though some spoke out against slavery.

February 3 112 Comments

Why Bernie Sanders Resonates With Young People

At the Iowa Democratic caucuses, he won 84 percent of voters aged 17 to 29, compared to Clinton's 14 percent.